FEEDBACK
Jobs Open Hiring
Post Resume
Get Exclusive Jobs
Ask a question:
52
 
42
 
20
 
31
Home » Where the Jobs Are, the Training May Not Be

12

Where the Jobs Are, the Training May Not Be

Source: nytimes.com Author: CATHERINE RAMPELL READ FULL ARTICLE AT nytimes.com

 Save

Jobsandcareer.com organizes the most comprehensive job and career advice/news.

  31
 
20
As state funding has dwindled, public colleges have raised tuition and are now resorting to even more desperate measures — cutting training for jobs the economy needs most.



Multimedia

Graphic
The Burden of Budget Cuts





Readers’ Comments
Readers shared their thoughts on this article.
Read All Comments (199) »



Technical, engineering and health care expertise are among the few skills in huge demand even in today’s lackluster job market. They are also, unfortunately, some of the most expensive subjects to teach. As a result, state colleges in Nebraska, Nevada,South Dakota, Colorado, Michigan, Florida and Texas have eliminated entire engineering and computer science departments.
At one community college in North Carolina — a state with a severe nursing shortage — nursing program applicants so outnumber available slots that there is a waiting list just to get on the waiting list.
This squeeze is one result of the states’ 25-year withdrawal from higher education. During and immediately after the last few recessions, states slashed financing for colleges. Then when the economy recovered, most states never fully restored the money that had been cut. The recent recession has amplified the problem.
“There has been a shift from the belief that we as a nation benefit from higher education, to a belief that it’s the people receiving the education who primarily benefit and so they should foot the bill,” said Ronald G. Ehrenberg, the director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute and a trustee of the State University of New York system.
Even large tuition increases have not fully offset state cuts, since many state legislatures cap how much colleges can charge for each course. So classes get bigger, tenured faculty members are replaced with adjuncts and technical courses are sacrificed.
State appropriations for colleges fell by 7.6 percent in 2011-12, the largest annual decline in at least five decades, according to a report from the Center for the Study of Education Policy at Illinois State University....

Full article: Where the Jobs Are, the Training May Not Be

More About: Job Creation Training

Mar 1 2012 submitted by Katie Baldwin

  31
 
20
0  Discussions
Discussion
Get Best Career Advice & Job News
We won't share your email address. Unsubscribe anytime.
JOBS and CAREER
- weekly newsletter -
Popular